Grammar Apps

Click each tab for information about a particular app, and how I use it in speech and language therapy with my students. Scroll down for more age groups.

Preschool


Speech with Milo: Verbs


Doonan Speech Therapy
HeadStart (3-4 year olds) through Early Elementary
How I use this app in speech therapy:
On the Home page there are 5 buttons: Therapist and Parent Instructions, Go, List of Actions (verbs), and Settings. The Instructions button provides a list of suggestions for using the app in therapy. Therapist instructions include ideas to expand therapy beyond the capacity of the app including teaching present progressive –ing, using pronouns, teaching past tense –ed, teaching auxiliary verbs, increasing sentence length (MLU), and answering questions. On the list of actions home page you can select to present the verbs in alphabetical order, random order of select the verbs you want to target in therapy. The green Go button starts the concept learning part of the app. During the demonstration, a female speaker presents the verb in present tense and then Milo performs an action. You can choose the green phrase button to hear the verb in present progressive tense (Milo is licking the ice cream).

It is a little disappointing that the objects involved in the action are not in color and that the present progressive tense is presented after the action and not during. The Settings button allows you to turn off the background music and the voice over. My students enjoy seeing Milo perform the action and we then act out the action during therapy in imitation and to generalize the action to therapy. We then practice past tense –ed by verbalizing what he just did. For my older students, we keep a list of the verbs, add –ed to make it regular past tense and change the verb to irregular past tense if needed. It’s also fun to play bingo, when Milo says the word, they put a chip on the picture symbol that matches (Symbolstix pictures from N2Y, Inc.). The developer may want to consider presenting the action word in the phrase and then add a button for past tense instead of “phrase”.

iPractice Verbs


Smarty Ears
HeadStart, Pre-K and Elementary. Middle and High for students with severe language impairments.
How I use this app in speech therapy:
On the Homepage of the app you are given two choices: Flash cards and Find it. I typically practice verbs first using the Flashcard mode and target 5-10 verbs per session with overlap across multiple settings to ensure memorization and learning. After selecting “Flash Cards” you are able to select the target verbs. I appreciate this feature because it gives me control over the verbs my students are practicing. Touch the verbs to select (a check mark will appear) or check “select all” to choose all verbs. After selecting the target verbs, choose “done” to enter the practice mode. On the screen you will see the first target word. To get an audible representation of the verb you must select one of the options in the bottom right: Word, Phrase or Sentence. You can also choose present tense, present progressive or past tense. You need only choose word, phrase or sentence one time and you can move back and forth through present, present progressive and past tense. In therapy, I require my students to imitate the word, phrase or sentence and then make up a sentence of their own (if they are able to). Swipe to move on to the next verb. The plus sign in the top right takes you back to the verb list.

There are several grammatical errors in the program that you will need to correct either during presentation or have your late Elem/Middle students find the errors and correct on their own. With my older students, I have them record the words, phrases and or sentences in a composition notebook so that they can practice at home. When you want to return to the main menu, click “back”. The “Find It” activity is an auditory game in which the student listens to a word, phrase or sentence for present tense, present progressive or past tense and then selects the corresponding picture from a field of 4. My students enjoy finding the verbs, but it is often too easy for late Elementary or middle school students. The app automatically continues to the next picture after the student receives visual and verbal feedback for a correct or incorrect selection.

Speech with Milo: Adjectives


Doonan Speech Therapy
HeadStart (3-4 year olds) through Early Elementary
Speech with Milo: Adjectives is yet another great product from Poorani Doonan, SLP, and her suite of Speech with Milo Apps. In my early years as a speech pathologist I often struggled with “how” to teach adjectives to my students in a fun interesting way. We would look at picture cards and describe the object or person (boring) or play games that involved learning adjectives to describe objects and or people (a little less boring). Then as computers entered the schools and the internet took over, I was able to turn to computer based activities (much better and more interesting to students). Now here were are in the iPad era. Interestingly, it seems as though most of the apps I have purchased can be used to teach adjectives (incidentally), but Milo stands out because it provides a tool to teach the skill directly. It doesn’t matter how many times my students watch the Milo animations, they always laugh (Milo getting sprayed with the hose for adjective “wet”) and are always excited about Milo’s adventures. Through Speech with Milo: Adjectives, my students have not only learned adjectives but also how to use those adjectives expressively in sentences to describe objects. Taking it one step further, my students have learned how to develop complete sentences to describe Milo’s actions, how to answer a variety of “wh” questions, how to compare and contrast two different adjectives (wet/dry, young/old). In addition to targeted adjectives, many of the animations have “hidden” adjectives that can also be targeted. My students with expressive language delays/impairments have made wonderful progress in therapy sessions with Milo.
How I use this app in speech therapy:
Speech with Milo: Adjectives includes the following contrasting pairs: happy/sad, wet/dry, long/short, dirty/clean, loud/quiet, rough/smooth, big/little, fat/skinny, young/old, hot/cold, heavy/light, straight/curvy, fast/slow, full/empty, dark/bright, hard/soft, tired/rested, angry/scared, low/high, thin/thick, narrow/wide, tall/flat, new/old, closed/open, first/last, and same/different.

Thanks to a wonderful gift from Poorani Doonan, my students will be extremely excited to see the “real” Milo doll in action. (Video on how to use the Milo doll to extend the Speech with Milo: Adjectives app to be posted in the next couple of days).

Therapy example for Wet/Dry:
Wet
Animation: Milo is standing next to a dirty (new adjective) car. To the left students see a hose connected to a spigot.
Prediction: What is Milo going to do?
Questions: Is his car clean (y/n), what’s wrong with his car?, Why is his car dirty? Where is Milo?, Why does he have a hose? etc.
Review: What happened to Milo? (The red hose sprayed him (went crazy) and he got all wet. Did he clean his car? (y/n). What happened when he turned on the water?
Prediction: What will happen next?

Dry
Animation: Milo is standing next to the same dirty car, but this time he is covered by water (from previous animation)
Prediction: What’s going to happen? What will Milo do?
Questions and review: What did Milo use to dry his face? (a pink towel-new adjective), Why did he dry his face? How did his face get wet? Is his car clean? Where was the pink towel?.
Prediction: What will happen next?

Speech With Milo: Nouns for iPad


Doonan Speech Therapy

How I use this app in speech therapy:

It’s rare in the world of apps to find something that is 100% original. Speech with Milo: Nouns may be the first. Developer Poorani Doonan, a certified Speech Language Pathologist, has taken advantage of the iPad’s front facing camera to immerse students’ images in the learning of nouns. It’s difficult to explain how amazing this app really is, all you have to do is look at a student’s face to see that they are mesmerized by their own image on the iPad screen in real time. One of my students said “Is that me and Milo?” OK, so “Me and Milo” is not correct grammar, but she did use the question word “is” for the first time!!

From a speech pathologist’s perspective, what has wowed me the most is the extensive variety of nouns separated into basic categories (toys, art, transportation, food:general, food: fruits and vegetables, food: snacks/dessert, animals: farm, animals: pets, animals: sea, animals: small, animals: wild, animals: wood, house: common, house: bathroom, house: kitchen, rooms, everyday objects, body parts, shapes, clothing, outside, people, places, and sports). By providing nouns in categories, Poorani Doonan enables speech pathologists to teach categorization skills in addition to new words.

Speech with Milo: Nouns also facilitates teaching pronouns, verbs and expanded sentences. Amazingly, during speech sessions, I am able to work on pronouns that are typically difficult for students to conceptualize, such as “I’m", "we", and "my,” as in “I’m looking at Milo”, “I’m under the cloud”, “We’re at the park” and “My face is in the middle of the sun”. We are also able to record our sentences and then watch them immediately in fits of laughter. It’s obvious that this app was developed by a seasoned Speech Pathologist who understands that an app should be much more than just the title.

- Amanda Backof, M.S. CCC-SLP (12/12)
scroll down for more age groups

Elementary

Sentence Builder for iPad


Mobile Education
Elementary (grades 3+ or younger if they are good readers)

Sentence Builder for iPhone


Mobile Education
Elementary (grades 3+ or younger if they are good readers)
How I use this app in speech therapy:
I use both of the Sentence Builder apps (this version and the Teen version) to teach my students how to look at sentences critically and make a decision about grammatical accuracy. These apps work well and hold student attention because they are colorful and students have to manipulate a rotating “wheel” to find correct words for the target sentence. Students must develop a sentence based on a given picture prompt and a set of possible words. A few of the words are preset which makes developing sentences easier. This app is a new twist on old paper therapy where students were required to edit and fix grammatical errors in sentences. My students like this app much better than pencil and paper activities and especially like getting the immediate feedback via fun animations.

iPractice Verbs


Smarty Ears
HeadStart, Pre-K and Elementary. Middle and High for students with severe language impairments.
How I use this app in speech therapy:
On the Homepage of the app you are given two choices: Flash cards and Find it. I typically practice verbs first using the Flashcard mode and target 5-10 verbs per session with overlap across multiple settings to ensure memorization and learning. After selecting “Flash Cards” you are able to select the target verbs. I appreciate this feature because it gives me control over the verbs my students are practicing. Touch the verbs to select (a check mark will appear) or check “select all” to choose all verbs. After selecting the target verbs, choose “done” to enter the practice mode. On the screen you will see the first target word. To get an audible representation of the verb you must select one of the options in the bottom right: Word, Phrase or Sentence. You can also choose present tense, present progressive or past tense. You need only choose word, phrase or sentence one time and you can move back and forth through present, present progressive and past tense. In therapy, I require my students to imitate the word, phrase or sentence and then make up a sentence of their own (if they are able to). Swipe to move on to the next verb. The plus sign in the top right takes you back to the verb list.

There are several grammatical errors in the program that you will need to correct either during presentation or have your late Elem/Middle students find the errors and correct on their own. With my older students, I have them record the words, phrases and or sentences in a composition notebook so that they can practice at home. When you want to return to the main menu, click “back”. The “Find It” activity is an auditory game in which the student listens to a word, phrase or sentence for present tense, present progressive or past tense and then selects the corresponding picture from a field of 4. My students enjoy finding the verbs, but it is often too easy for late Elementary or middle school students. The app automatically continues to the next picture after the student receives visual and verbal feedback for a correct or incorrect selection.

Plurals Fun Deck


Super Duper
Grades pre-K through 3
How I use this app in speech therapy:
Super Duper is creating electronic versions of the card decks we have all carried around for years. While not interactive, they are definitely easier on the back!

more info…coming soon!

Irregular Verbs Fun Deck


Super Duper
Grades K through 3
How I use this app in speech therapy:
Super Duper is creating electronic versions of the card decks we have all carried around for years. While not interactive, they are definitely easier on the back!

more info…coming soon!
How I use this app in speech therapy:

I have been using this app for over a month with my middle school students with autism and am amazed by their level of attention, motivation and overall love for this app. Rainbow sentences was developed by a father who recognized that color coding sentence parts helps increase grammar use and understanding. Speech Pathologists, myself included, have been using this technique for years (when our color printers have ink) via laminated sentences with Velcro in jumbled sentence activities with some success. I have to say, my students have never been as motivated with my homemade activities as they are with Rainbow Sentences. There’s just something about it..It’s mesmerizing!

The app opens with a menu that allows you to choose from three different levels. Each level, containing 55 sentences each, allows the student to drag the words to make a sentence as the sentence parts are narrated. Level 1 provides practice with subject and verb+ing: The horse is jumping; Level 2 provides practice with subject, verb+ing and place of action; and Level 3 provides practice developing sentences with subject, verb+ing, place of action, where the action is taking place and why it's happening. There’s a natural flow and consistency to the app in which each level builds on the previous one using the same grammatical structures and color coding as the sentence complexity increases.

As students work on building sentences, the words are divided into short grammatical parts such as subject, predicate, prepositional phrases, etc. You have the option of having each grammar part color coded (all subjects are: blue, verbs: red, prepositional phrases: green, adverbial clauses: orange) or presenting them all in black to increase the level of difficulty. With the color coding scheme, students are also able to answer comprehension questions such as “who is the sentence about?”(blue), “what are they doing?”(red), “where is the action taking place”(green), and “why is it happening”(orange). A few of my students with autism really struggle with answering “why” questions, so the color coding is very helpful for them. They are now able to look for the color orange and answer the “why” question independently. We have just recently started sentence building without colors and I am waiting to see if carryover happens..fingers crossed!

In addition to grammar, this app has helped some of my struggling readers by providing a visual representation of the sentence. For example, “The whale is sitting by the pool.” has a cute illustration of a whale at the pool with sunglasses on his head asking for lemonade. If students need guidance in understanding how to put the words together, there is a “Play lesson” button which walks students through the process of building a sentence via building blocks.

The carryover of using correct grammatical structures to express present tense in conversational speech and to other classroom based pencil/paper activities has been remarkable. Rainbow Sentences provides the visual and interactive component to grammar practice that auditory activities and worksheet activities cannot. I have several students who have significant difficulty developing grammatically correct sentences in conversation, even though the thoughts are well formed in their heads. Rainbow Sentences has helped them understand that sentences are made up of words and there are different grammatical parts to each sentence (i.e., nouns, verbs, etc) that need to be in a specific order to make sense to listeners. Not all of my students have achieved this level of metalinguistic awareness, but a few have. Rainbow Sentences provided a jumping off point for this knowledge.

Within “Settings”, Speech-Language Pathologists are able to choose the level of difficulty, choose whether or not color coding is used, choose to group words into short phrases, turn on or off the ability to record student verbalizations of sentences (which my students love), the ability to receive correct answer reinforcement and line color coding. All student recordings can be saved and listened to at a later time and are found in the “Archive” section of the app. Within the “Stats” section you can email stats to parents or teachers, clear all stats or use it as a reference to track student progress. At the end of 5 trials the student is rewarded with a piece of a puzzle. In order to view a short animation the student must correctly complete 12 trials of 5. This is a brilliant feature and my students are on board from the start and motivated to get the short movie.

Overall, my students and I LOVE this app! It’s engaging, motivating and educational.

Speech with Milo: Verbs


Doonan Speech Therapy
HeadStart (3-4 year olds) through Early Elementary
How I use this app in speech therapy:
On the Home page there are 5 buttons: Therapist and Parent Instructions, Go, List of Actions (verbs), and Settings. The Instructions button provides a list of suggestions for using the app in therapy. Therapist instructions include ideas to expand therapy beyond the capacity of the app including teaching present progressive –ing, using pronouns, teaching past tense –ed, teaching auxiliary verbs, increasing sentence length (MLU), and answering questions. On the list of actions home page you can select to present the verbs in alphabetical order, random order of select the verbs you want to target in therapy. The green Go button starts the concept learning part of the app. During the demonstration, a female speaker presents the verb in present tense and then Milo performs an action. You can choose the green phrase button to hear the verb in present progressive tense (Milo is licking the ice cream).

It is a little disappointing that the objects involved in the action are not in color and that the present progressive tense is presented after the action and not during. The Settings button allows you to turn off the background music and the voice over. My students enjoy seeing Milo perform the action and we then act out the action during therapy in imitation and to generalize the action to therapy. We then practice past tense –ed by verbalizing what he just did. For my older students, we keep a list of the verbs, add –ed to make it regular past tense and change the verb to irregular past tense if needed. It’s also fun to play bingo, when Milo says the word, they put a chip on the picture symbol that matches (Symbolstix pictures from N2Y, Inc.). The developer may want to consider presenting the action word in the phrase and then add a button for past tense instead of “phrase”.

You're the Story Teller: The Surprise


by Hamaguchi Apps

TheSurprise1


TheSurprise2

How I use this app in speech therapy:

Youre the Story Teller: The Surprise by Hamaguchi Apps has allowed me to teach verbal comprehension, narration, sentence grammar and pragmatics, all within the context of one expertly developed and extremely humorous app! The app, on the market since May 2012, continues to surprise me in its versatility and ability to keep student interest across multiple sessions and months. What’s brilliant about this simple app/story is that it is wordless. Students narrate their own version of the story by recording their own voices via “Narrator’s tools” and/or type the story in the writing area. My students have enjoyed doing both.Younger students love to record their voices telling the story and older students enjoy typing. For my young students I have developed sentence starters using Symbolstix pictures (similar to Picture the Sentence app which they are used to using), providing a visual aid to support detailed grammatically correct sentences (worksheet below left). Without the model, sentence length was reduced and grammar was horrible (don’t want to practice that!!). As they became accustomed to the story I was able to reduce visual supports.

My students love The Surprise and beg for the story to continue. I’m hoping Part 2 is in the works. The characters are adorable and likable, not “creepy with big eyes” as my niece would say. The story follows the arc of a narrative and has an unexpected resolution. To extend beyond the story, I have had students predict what will happen next and continue the story in their own words. The app allows for discussions about character motivations, decision making, non verbal language, cause and effect and being honest. I have not come across a single IEP goal that could not be worked on using this app. It’s even possible to work on articulation and fluency! (Just be sure to record the words in the writing are before the session.)

Since the story is wordless, I often develop my own narrative to work on verbal comprehension along with comprehension questions. You can add questions to the writing area and/or have your older students make up their own questions, “for the little kids you will work with later in the day”. (LOL, they are unknowingly working on questioning skills too). In addition to developing my own narrative I have created “who” question cards to extend the app with my young students who are struggling to answer basic questions (see worksheet, below left).

Patti Hamaguchi, a Speech Language Pathologist and creator of the app, has provided wonderful tips for clinicians for working on articulation, language, grammar/syntax and pragmatics, in the “info” section of the app. This is a great resource!

Tense Builder

by Mobile Education

One of our strengths as Speech Language Pathologists is our amazing ability to re-purpose just about anything into a usable therapy tool (i.e., taking those old toys or manipulatives from years ago that teachers were going to throw out, putting them in a bag and making a describing activity). I’ve found I use apps in the same way. Mobile Education’s Tense Builder was developed to help students learn about the different verb tenses. It’s a genius ap, as is, but WAIT…THERE’s MORE!! (as the infomercials say). I used this app for an entire year with several groups of students, both with autism and without, all ages pre-K to middle school, and they were never bored. Right out of the box, you are able to work on a variety of verb tenses (future, present, past) both regular and irregular. Students watch a short, hysterically funny animated video (I have been known to laugh out loud myself), and then either choose from a field of three to tell what has happened, is happening or will happen (Level 1) or drag words into a blank to make a complete sentence from a field of 2-7 verbs (Level 2). After finding the correct answer, my students LOVE listening to the sentence containing the verb and then recording themselves saying the sentences. There are many different options under the settings button at the bottom, and you can also keep stats of student progress and then email it to yourself. The app also includes a comprehensive lesson on irregular verbs, regular verbs, past present and or future.

Let’s look at how we can repurpose Tense Builder and go beyond its original intent:

Narration-students retell the action in their own words.

Coordinating conjunctions for non readers, writers- Since I do not have a white board in my room, I write the conjunctions on the table in front of the student. Every animated short has a primary action and a secondary action (cause and effect-perfect for conjunctions). For the word “see” the primary event/action is a little girl roasting a marshmallow over a campfire who sees a snake. Secondary action: she screams, jumps on the rock, her family comes out of the tent and the snake eats her marshmallow. Multiple compound and complex sentence possibilities.

Articulation

Pronoun Development- simple pronouns and reflexive (herself, himself, etc)

Sequencing a story with temporal concepts- First the girl saw a snake, then it ate her marshmallow.

Basic concept development- The girl was sitting on a rock, the snake was behind her, she was roasting a marshmallow over a campfire, and her family was in the tent.

Social interaction between students

Using articles, verbs, nouns

Using adjectives to describe objects/characters- The scared girl jumped on the rock, the orange and black snake ate her marshmallow, and the surprised family heard her scream.

Answering who, what, where, when, why questions

Working on fluency

Thank you to Mobile Education for making such a wonderful app!! I am really looking forward to the newest Crack the Books iTextbooks, Pines to Vines - the Forest Biome. Individually Leveled non-fiction books for 2nd-6th grade aligned to common core state standards. The app will include videos, animations, visual supports , quizzes, etc. Exactly what our students need. Very excited to share these interesting topics with my students (forests, grasslands and oceans). I can’t wait!!!

(Amanda Backof, M.S. CCC-SLP 9/13)

Middle & High School


iPractice Verbs


Smarty Ears
HeadStart, Pre-K and Elementary. Middle and High for students with severe language impairments.
How I use this app in speech therapy:
On the Homepage of the app you are given two choices: Flash cards and Find it. I typically practice verbs first using the Flashcard mode and target 5-10 verbs per session with overlap across multiple settings to ensure memorization and learning. After selecting “Flash Cards” you are able to select the target verbs. I appreciate this feature because it gives me control over the verbs my students are practicing. Touch the verbs to select (a check mark will appear) or check “select all” to choose all verbs. After selecting the target verbs, choose “done” to enter the practice mode. On the screen you will see the first target word. To get an audible representation of the verb you must select one of the options in the bottom right: Word, Phrase or Sentence. You can also choose present tense, present progressive or past tense. You need only choose word, phrase or sentence one time and you can move back and forth through present, present progressive and past tense. In therapy, I require my students to imitate the word, phrase or sentence and then make up a sentence of their own (if they are able to). Swipe to move on to the next verb. The plus sign in the top right takes you back to the verb list.

There are several grammatical errors in the program that you will need to correct either during presentation or have your late Elem/Middle students find the errors and correct on their own. With my older students, I have them record the words, phrases and or sentences in a composition notebook so that they can practice at home. When you want to return to the main menu, click “back”. The “Find It” activity is an auditory game in which the student listens to a word, phrase or sentence for present tense, present progressive or past tense and then selects the corresponding picture from a field of 4. My students enjoy finding the verbs, but it is often too easy for late Elementary or middle school students. The app automatically continues to the next picture after the student receives visual and verbal feedback for a correct or incorrect selection.

Sentence Builder Teen (iPad)


Mobile Education
Middle to High School
How I use this app in speech therapy:
I use both of the Sentence Builder apps (this version and the original version for elementary age) to teach my students how to look at sentences critically and make a decision about grammatical accuracy. These apps work well and hold student attention because they are colorful and students have to manipulate a rotating “wheel” to find correct words for the target sentence. Students must develop a sentence based on a given picture prompt and a set of possible words. A few of the words are preset which makes developing sentences easier. This app is a new twist on old paper therapy where students were required to edit and fix grammatical errors in sentences. My students like this app much better than pencil and paper activities and especially like getting the immediate feedback via fun animations.

Shake a Phrase


Artgig Apps
Ages 8+
How I use this app in speech therapy:
I am a huge fan of this app! It allows SLPs to delve into the world of using context clues to determine the meaning of unknown words. Students are presented with silly phrases containing many words not readily available in their lexicons. Choose from five available themes: Shake starter, Animals, Fairytale, Monsters and Sports. During therapy students read the silly phrase and we practice using context clues to determine the meaning of unknown words. Once we believe we have the correct definition we can confirm by touching the word (a definition instantly appears). When students have difficulties with synonyms and antonyms, we look for unknown words, find the meaning using context clues, and record the word and meaning. After they record the word and meaning, we have a discussion about synonyms and antonyms. This app is also great for learning the parts of a sentence (verbs, nouns and adjectives) via the “quiz me” section. Again, students are required to read a crazy sentence and then choose the verbs, adjectives or nouns, which is a great way to bring up the topic of expanding written language to include details and all of the necessary parts. There are also “Story Starters” which can be used to begin narrative development. (Also check out the Toontastic app to teach your students the components of a narrative.)
How I use this app in speech therapy:

I have been using this app for over a month with my middle school students with autism and am amazed by their level of attention, motivation and overall love for this app. Rainbow sentences was developed by a father who recognized that color coding sentence parts helps increase grammar use and understanding. Speech Pathologists, myself included, have been using this technique for years (when our color printers have ink) via laminated sentences with Velcro in jumbled sentence activities with some success. I have to say, my students have never been as motivated with my homemade activities as they are with Rainbow Sentences. There’s just something about it..It’s mesmerizing!

The app opens with a menu that allows you to choose from three different levels. Each level, containing 55 sentences each, allows the student to drag the words to make a sentence as the sentence parts are narrated. Level 1 provides practice with subject and verb+ing: The horse is jumping; Level 2 provides practice with subject, verb+ing and place of action; and Level 3 provides practice developing sentences with subject, verb+ing, place of action, where the action is taking place and why it's happening. There’s a natural flow and consistency to the app in which each level builds on the previous one using the same grammatical structures and color coding as the sentence complexity increases.

As students work on building sentences, the words are divided into short grammatical parts such as subject, predicate, prepositional phrases, etc. You have the option of having each grammar part color coded (all subjects are: blue, verbs: red, prepositional phrases: green, adverbial clauses: orange) or presenting them all in black to increase the level of difficulty. With the color coding scheme, students are also able to answer comprehension questions such as “who is the sentence about?”(blue), “what are they doing?”(red), “where is the action taking place”(green), and “why is it happening”(orange). A few of my students with autism really struggle with answering “why” questions, so the color coding is very helpful for them. They are now able to look for the color orange and answer the “why” question independently. We have just recently started sentence building without colors and I am waiting to see if carryover happens..fingers crossed!

In addition to grammar, this app has helped some of my struggling readers by providing a visual representation of the sentence. For example, “The whale is sitting by the pool.” has a cute illustration of a whale at the pool with sunglasses on his head asking for lemonade. If students need guidance in understanding how to put the words together, there is a “Play lesson” button which walks students through the process of building a sentence via building blocks.

The carryover of using correct grammatical structures to express present tense in conversational speech and to other classroom based pencil/paper activities has been remarkable. Rainbow Sentences provides the visual and interactive component to grammar practice that auditory activities and worksheet activities cannot. I have several students who have significant difficulty developing grammatically correct sentences in conversation, even though the thoughts are well formed in their heads. Rainbow Sentences has helped them understand that sentences are made up of words and there are different grammatical parts to each sentence (i.e., nouns, verbs, etc) that need to be in a specific order to make sense to listeners. Not all of my students have achieved this level of metalinguistic awareness, but a few have. Rainbow Sentences provided a jumping off point for this knowledge.

Within “Settings”, Speech-Language Pathologists are able to choose the level of difficulty, choose whether or not color coding is used, choose to group words into short phrases, turn on or off the ability to record student verbalizations of sentences (which my students love), the ability to receive correct answer reinforcement and line color coding. All student recordings can be saved and listened to at a later time and are found in the “Archive” section of the app. Within the “Stats” section you can email stats to parents or teachers, clear all stats or use it as a reference to track student progress. At the end of 5 trials the student is rewarded with a piece of a puzzle. In order to view a short animation the student must correctly complete 12 trials of 5. This is a brilliant feature and my students are on board from the start and motivated to get the short movie.

Overall, my students and I LOVE this app! It’s engaging, motivating and educational.